Cornelius Van Vorst, ca.1620; 
Jersey City Free Public Library; Grover Cleveland Political Cartoon; 
Grover Cleveland Birthplace Historical Site Collection Peter Lee, former slave, ca.1880; 
Hoboken Historical Photographs Collection; Farm Map of Hillsboro, Somerset County, 1860; 
Historical Maps of New Jersey Collection; Bathing Beauties, 1890-1930; 
American Labor Museum/Botto House National Landmark Collection; Flag Salute, 1950; 
Seabrook Farms Collection;

Social Protest in the 1960s and 1970s
United States history has a consistent record of social protest. From the Boston Tea Party to Harper's Ferry to Seneca Falls, our nation has been built on the struggle for freedom of speech and assembly and by the brave individuals who fought for a variety of social issues. The right to govern themselves, slavery, discrimination, racism, and sexism (among others) kept Americans involved in the fight for equality.
The conformity of the 1950's covered up the social tension which was the kindling for the fire during the sixties. Vietnam, civil rights, and political participation were the social issues that lit the flame. The fire was kept burning by the youth of America; teenagers and young adults across high schools and universities dove head first into a variety of movements.
Explore their methods and the issues they cared about on the following pages. Decide for yourself their success or failures, but remember that their actions have shaped the world you live in today. The underlying social issues they fought for remain relevant in contemporary society.
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