Cornelius Van Vorst, ca.1620; 
Jersey City Free Public Library; Grover Cleveland Political Cartoon; 
Grover Cleveland Birthplace Historical Site Collection Peter Lee, former slave, ca.1880; 
Hoboken Historical Photographs Collection; Farm Map of Hillsboro, Somerset County, 1860; 
Historical Maps of New Jersey Collection; Bathing Beauties, 1890-1930; 
American Labor Museum/Botto House National Landmark Collection; Flag Salute, 1950; 
Seabrook Farms Collection;

Testimonials
Extract from the Annual Report of the State Geologist of New Jersey (Prof. George H. Cook) for 1886, p. 210.
"The Passaic River, at Belleville, from which the supplies for Newark and Jersey City are now pumped, is disgustingly impure, and is constantly liable to dangerous contamination. With sources of supply unquestioned in purity, and more abundant than those used for the supply of Boston, New York, or Philadelphia, and at a manageable expense, there is no justifiable excuse for longer delay in the introduction of this element so essential for health, comfort, and cleanliness."
Andrew Clerk, Esq.
"Surely the health of some 300,000 people who drink the water daily, ought to have some consideration with your honorable body, and I tell you unless the bill is passed it will be the death blow to the prosperity of Jersey City and Newark; for in a very few years, certainly within five years, the water will not be fit for human beings to drink. Those who have the means will leave us, and there will be none to come to take their places; the poorer classes and those who have their all invested here will be the greatest sufferers."
Wilmon W. C. Sites, Chief Engineer of Jersey City
"The recent improvements in the navigation of the Passaic river, made by the National Government in the removal of reefs and other obstructions to navigation, have resulted in allowing a greatly increased volume of salt water to enter the river from the Bay at each flood tide, and during the period of least flow in the river; a flow of salt water is forced up the stream far above the 'Intakes' of the Jersey City and Newark works, so that in a dry season when the volume of fresh water coming down the river is reduced, the water that is drawn from the stream for the use of the two cities, contains a very large percentage of sea water.
From the result of a long series of chemical analyses made during the dry season last summer, by Prof. Albert R. Leeds, of the Stevens Institute of Technology, at Hoboken, chemist to the Water Boards of both Newark and Jersey City was, at high tide, 30,000 gallons to every million gallons of water pumped, while at Newark it was 8,000 gallons to the million. The evil results of this admixture of salt water is felt not only in the water used for domestic purposes, but is destructive to steam boilers and endangers their safe use by reason of the incrustation of salt within them. In addition, it renders the water unfit for use in many industrial establishments, where pure water is a necessity, and results in great loss, directly and indirectly, to the people of all the cities using the water.
In addition to the evil of salt water, the flood tide carries with it great quantities of sewage of the city of Newark and the town of Harrison, which sewage is forced into the reservoirs of both cities by our pumps."
Extract from the Sixth Annual Report of the Board of Health of the State of New Jersey
"The two largest cities of the State, and much of the thickly settled surrounding country, derive their supply of water from a stream defiled by the emptying point t which it is drawn. This condition of affairs must continue to grow worse, since the natural growth of the communities increases alike the demand for pure water, and the contamination of that upon which they depend."
Extract from the Seventh Annual Report from the Board of Health of the State of New Jersey
"Foul liquids from graves may enter and pollute a stream, *** and if the water be used from drinking, injury to the health may result. *** It is necessary, therefore, in order to obviate risk from this cause, that a cemetery should have a suitable soil, and be properly drained, and that it should be at a sufficient distance from subterranneous source of water supply; and in such a position, with respect to them, that the percolation of foul matters from one to the other may be impossible."
Extract from the Seventh Annual Report from the Board of Health of the State of New Jersey
"Foul liquids from graves may enter and pollute a stream, *** and if the water be used from drinking, injury to the health may result. *** It is necessary, therefore, in order to obviate risk from this cause, that a cemetery should have a suitable soil, and be properly drained, and that it should be at a sufficient distance from subterranneous source of water supply; and in such a position, with respect to them, that the percolation of foul matters from one to the other may be impossible."
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